Urinary Incontinence and Its Association with Frailty among Men Aged 80 Years or Older in Taiwan: A Cross-Sectional Study

Chih Jen Wang, Cheng Hao Hung, Ting Ching Tang, Liang Yu Chen, Li Ning Peng, Fei Yuan Hsiao, Liang Kung Chen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims: To evaluate the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) and its association with frailty among men aged 80 years and older in Taiwan. Methods: Residents living in four veterans retirement communities were invited for study and 440 men aged 80 years and older were enrolled. Comprehensive geriatric assessment was performed for them, which composed of Clinical Frailty Scale, Northern Health and Social Care Trust (HSC)-Continence Assessment Form, Charlson's Comorbidity Index (CCI), Barthel Index (BI), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Geriatric Depression Scale-5 (GDS-5), and Mini-Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF). Results: In this study, the overall prevalence of UI was 19.1% (mostly urgency incontinence and functional incontinence). Univariate analyses were performed to evaluate the associations between UI and other variables. Frailty was more common among subjects with UI than those without (60.7% vs 32.3%, p < 0.001). Besides, subjects with UI had more comorbidity (CCI: 1.40 ± 1.15 vs 0.89 ± 0.89, p < 0.001), poorer physical function (BI: 65.77 ± 33.39 vs 84.12 ± 24.08, p < 0.001; IADL: 3.46 ± 2.64 vs 4.41 ± 2.25, p = 0.003), more depressive symptoms (GDS-5: 1.83 ± 1.78 vs 1.18 ± 1.36, p = 0.02), poorer cognitive function (MMSE: 16.57 ± 7.65 vs 19.37 ± 6.82, p = 0.001), poorer nutritional status (MNA-SF: 10.0 ± 03.03 vs 11.23 ± 2.24, p = 0.001), more polypharmacy (66.7% vs 45.2%, p < 0.001) and higher chance of stool incontinence (22.6% vs 1.7%, p < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression showed that UI was independently associated with frailty, (odds ratio [OR] = 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2-3.6; p = 0.012), stool incontinence (OR = 14.4; 95% CI 5.2-39.7; p < 0.001) and depressive symptoms (OR = 1.30; 95% CI 1.10-1.54; p = 0.002). Conclusions: About one fifth of study subjects had UI (mostly urgency and functional incontinence type), which was significantly associated with frailty, stool incontinence and depressive symptoms. Further study is needed to evaluate the possibilities of reversing these geriatric syndromes by an integrated intervention program.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-117
Number of pages7
JournalRejuvenation Research
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2017

Keywords

  • Clinical Frailty Scale
  • frailty
  • octogenarian
  • urinary incontinence

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