Two-month breathing-based walking improves anxiety, depression, dyspnoea and quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A randomised controlled study

Feng Lien Lin, Mei Ling Yeh*, Yeur Hur Lai, Kuan Chia Lin, Chong Jen Yu, Jung San Chang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims and objectives: To examine the effects of the two-month breathing-based walking intervention and its follow-up on anxiety, depression, dyspnoea and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Background: Mind–body-related exercises improve bio-psychological symptoms and quality of life in chronic diseases, but these improvements are not proven for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Design: This was a randomised controlled study and applied the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement. Methods: Outpatients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were recruited from a medical centre in Taiwan and randomly assigned to two groups. The walking group (n = 42) received breathing, meditation and walking for two months, and the control group (n = 42) did not. Data from the outcomes of anxiety, depression, dyspnoea and quality of life were collected at baseline and in Month 1, Month 2 and Month 3. Clinical trial registration was done (ClinicalTrials.gov.: NCT03388489). Findings: The results showed significant changes in anxiety, depression, dyspnoea and quality of life in the walking group across three months, compared to those in the control group and at baseline. Conclusion: This breathing-based walking intervention is promising to achieve bio-psychological well-being for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Relevance to clinical practice: This breathing-based walking, as a mind–body exercise, could serve as an evidence-based nursing care that contributes to improving anxiety, depression, dyspnoea and quality of life in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease outpatients. The feasibility and acceptability of the breathing-based walking were met the requirement of the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease outpatients, which could be considered as home-based exercise.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3632-3640
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume28
Issue number19-20
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2019

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • breathing
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • depression
  • dyspnoea
  • quality of life
  • walking

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Two-month breathing-based walking improves anxiety, depression, dyspnoea and quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A randomised controlled study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this