The changes of muscle strength and functional activities during aging in male and female populations

Shih Jung Cheng, Yea Ru Yang, Fang Yu Cheng, I. Hsuan Chen, Ray Yau Wang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Aging is associated with the loss of muscle strength and difficulties in functional activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes of muscle strength and functional activities during aging in male and female individuals.

Methods This study was a cross-sectional study recruiting healthy individuals aged 40-89 years. The muscle strength of bilateral hip flexors, knee extensors, and ankle plantar flexors were measured. Activities including functional reach test, timed up and go test, and alternating stair stepping were also measured.

Results A total of 373 male and 371 female individuals participated in this study. The muscle strength of hip flexors and knee extensors were all significantly decreased after age 80 years as compared with the age group of 40-49 years in both male and female groups. The abilities of functional reach and timed up and go task were significantly decreased after age 70 years in the male group and decreased after age 60 years in the female group as compared with the age group of 40-49 years.

Conclusion We noted that the muscle strength and functional activities were decreased earlier in female than male individuals. The decrease of functional activities during the aging process seems to be earlier than the decrease of muscle strength. It is important to implement functional activities training in addition to strengthening exercise to maintain functional levels of the geriatric population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-202
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Gerontology
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2014

Keywords

  • age
  • functional activity
  • gender
  • muscle strength

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