Single SnO 2 gas sensor as a practical tool for evaluating the efficiency of odor control engineering at food waste composting plants

Chung Jung Tsai, Mei Lien Chen, An Di Ye, I. Fang Mao*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a single tin oxide (SnO 2) gas sensor as a simple and reliable tool for evaluating the efficiency of odor control engineering at food waste composting plants, by correlating sensor responses with chemical concentrations of critical odorants and olfactometric data obtained under laboratory and field conditions. Three critical odorants, including dimethylsulfide, trimethylamine and acetic acid, were prepared in various concentrations, ranging from parts per billion, to parts per million levels. Field samples were collected from two large food waste composting plants in Taiwan. The results indicated that the sensor responses showed significant linear correlation with the chemical concentration of the three target odorants (P < 0.01) and with the olfactometric data for these odorants at various concentrations (P < 0.01). The correlation coefficients were all above 0.940. For field odor measurement, the SnO 2 gas sensor responses showed a good linear correlation with the olfactometric data for samples inside the composting plants, at exhaust outlets and at downwind boundaries (P < 0.01), and the correlation coefficient was 0.963; the coefficient of variation (CV%) of the sensor for triplicate measurements was 0.9-8.4%.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)248-254
Number of pages7
JournalSensors and Actuators, B: Chemical
Volume169
DOIs
StatePublished - 5 Jul 2012

Keywords

  • Electronic nose
  • Food waste composting
  • Gas sensor
  • Odor measurement
  • Tin oxide

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