Risk of Parental Psychiatric Disorders Among Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder According to Response to Antidepressant Treatment: Does the Type of Antidepressant Matter?

Shih Jen Tsai*, Ju Wei Hsu, Kai Lin Huang, Ya Mei Bai, Tung Ping Su, Tzeng-Ji Chen, Mu Hong Chen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The genetic load for major depressive disorder (MDD) may be higher in people who develop MDD earlier in life. This study aimed to investigate whether the parents of adolescents with MDD were more likely to have MDD, bipolar disorder (BD), schizophrenic disorder (SZ), alcohol use disorder, or substance use disorder than the parents of adolescents without MDD. We also examined whether the response to antidepressant treatment predicted the likelihood of parental psychiatric disorders. Methods: Adolescents aged 12-19 years who had a diagnosis of MDD between 2001 and 2011 were included, and they were classified as antidepressant responsive or antidepressant resistant according to their response to antidepressant treatment. A control group was formed that included randomly selected individuals with no severe mental disorders who were matched by age, sex, family income, and residence. Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the likelihood of parental psychiatric disorders among adolescents who were antidepressant resistant, adolescents who were antidepressant responsive, and individuals in the control group. Results: We included 1,758 adolescents with MDD who were antidepressant resistant, 7,032 adolescents with MDD who were treatment responsive, and 7,032 age-matched and sex-matched controls. The parents of the adolescents with MDD were more likely to be diagnosed with MDD, BD, SZ, alcohol use disorder, or substance use disorder than the parents of the control group. The parents of adolescents who were antidepressant resistant and the mothers of adolescents who were either treatment resistant or treatment responsive were more likely to be diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder. Discussion: Our study demonstrated that parents of adolescents with MDD may be more likely to be diagnosed with MDD, BD, SZ, alcohol use disorder, or substance use disorder than parents of adolescents without MDD, suggesting the within-disorder transmission and cross-disorder transmission of these psychiatric disorders. Furthermore, the parent's sex and the response to antidepressant treatment may affect the within-disorder transmission of MDD.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCNS Spectrums
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • antidepressant-resistant depression
  • antidepressant-responsive

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