Risk of depressive disorders following myasthenia gravis: A nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study

Hsuan Te Chu, Chih Chieh Tseng, Chih Sung Liang, Ta Chuan Yeh, Li Yu Hu, Albert C. Yang, Shih Jen Tsai*, Cheng Che Shen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The chronic autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized by fluctuating muscle weakness, which can lead to a large amount of stress in the patient. The current investigation plans to assess the risk of depressive disorders in MG patients. A retrospective cohort study of patients ageing 20 years and older and also newly diagnosed with MG between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2008, was conducted from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) in Taiwan. Observations of all 349 MG patients and 1,396 control individuals were made until a diagnosis of a depressive disorder by a psychiatrist, until death, or until December 31, 2013. A range of comorbidities were found, such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia, with cerebrovascular disease being reported more frequently in MG patients in comparison with control subjects. After adjustment of patients' sex, age, urbanization, comorbidities, and monthly income, results indicated that MG individuals are 1.94 times more at risk (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-3.27, P = 0.014) of developing depressive disorders than are controls. This showed an increased risk in the development of depressive disorders in people with MG. Thus, depressive symptoms in MG patients should be regularly assessed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number481
JournalFrontiers in Psychiatry
Volume10
Issue numberJULY
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Comorbidity
  • Depression
  • Economic condition
  • Myasthenia gravis
  • Retrospective cohort study

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