Novel gait training alters functional brain connectivity during walking in chronic stroke patients: A randomized controlled pilot trial

I. Hsuan Chen, Yea Ru Yang, Chia Feng Lu, Ray Yau Wang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: A recent study has demonstrated that a turning-based treadmill program yields greater improvements in gait speed and temporal symmetry than regular treadmill training in chronic stroke patients. However, it remains unknown how this novel and challenging gait training shapes the cortico-cortical network and cortico-spinal network during walking in chronic stroke patients. The purpose of this study was to examine how a novel type of gait training, which is an unfamiliar but effective task for people with chronic stroke, enhances brain reorganization. Methods: Subjects in the experimental and control groups received 30 min of turning-based treadmill training and regular treadmill training, respectively. Cortico-cortical connectivity and cortico-muscular connectivity during walking and gait performance were assessed before and after completing the 12-session training. Results: Eighteen subjects (n = 9 per group) with a mean age of 52.5 ± 9.7 years and an overground walking speed of 0.61 ± 0.26 m/s consented and participated in this study. There were significant group by time interactions for gait speed, temporal gait symmetry, and cortico-cortical connectivity as well as cortico-muscular connectivity in walk-related frequency (24-40 Hz) over the frontal-central-parietal areas. Compared with the regular treadmill training, the turning-based treadmill training resulted in greater improvements in these measures. Moreover, the increases in cortico-cortical connectivity and cortico-muscular connectivity while walking were associated with improvements in temporal gait symmetry. Conclusions: Our findings suggest this novel turning-based treadmill training is effective for enhancing brain functional reorganization underlying cortico-cortical and corticomuscular mechanisms and thus may result in gait improvement in people with chronic stroke.

Original languageEnglish
Article number33
JournalJournal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 28 Feb 2019

Keywords

  • Brain connectivity
  • EEG
  • EMG
  • Gait
  • Stroke
  • Turning

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Novel gait training alters functional brain connectivity during walking in chronic stroke patients: A randomized controlled pilot trial'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this