Multiomics reveal the central role of pentose phosphate pathway in resident thymic macrophages to cope with efferocytosis-associated stress

Tsung Lin Tsai, Tyng An Zhou, Yu Ting Hsieh, Ju Chu Wang, Hui Kuei Cheng, Chen Hua Huang, Pei Yuan Tsai, Hsiu Han Fan, Hsing Kai Feng, Yu Chia Huang, Chen Ching Lin, Chao Hsiung Lin, Chih Yu Lin, Ivan L. Dzhagalov, Chia Lin Hsu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Tissue-resident macrophages (TRMs) are heterogeneous cell populations found throughout the body. Depending on their location, they perform diverse functions maintaining tissue homeostasis and providing immune surveillance. To survive and function within, TRMs adapt metabolically to the distinct microenvironments. However, little is known about the metabolic signatures of TRMs. The thymus provides a nurturing milieu for developing thymocytes yet efficiently removes those that fail the selection, relying on the resident thymic macrophages (TMφs). This study harnesses multiomics analyses to characterize TMφs and unveils their metabolic features. We find that the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is preferentially activated in TMφs, responding to the reduction-oxidation demands associated with the efferocytosis of dying thymocytes. The blockade of PPP in Mφs leads to decreased efferocytosis, which can be rescued by reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers. Our study reveals the key role of the PPP in TMφs and underscores the importance of metabolic adaptation in supporting Mφ efferocytosis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number111065
JournalCell Reports
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 12 Jul 2022

Keywords

  • CP: Immunology
  • CP: Metabolism
  • efferocytosis
  • metabolic flexibility
  • pentose phosphate pathway
  • reduction-oxidation
  • thymus
  • tissue-resident macrophage

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