Modelling relationships among students’ inquiry-related learning activities, enjoyment of learning, and their intended choice of a future STEM career

Hsin Hui Wang, Huann shyang Lin, Ya-Chun Chen, Yi Ting Pan, Zuway R. Hong*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study explored how specific inquiry-related learning activities were related to student enjoyment of learning science and intended choice of future STEM career. Analysis of Taiwan and Australia PISA 2015 data revealed that three activities, namely, debating and planning experiments, drawing conclusions and doing hands-on experiments, teachers and students explaining ideas, were significantly related to students’ enjoyment of learning science and intended choice of STEM careers in these two countries. Cross-national comparisons indicated that the percentages of inquiry-related activities for high or low scientific competency students in Australia were higher than for Taiwanese students. The activity of teachers and students explaining ideas was a significant determinant of enjoyment of learning for Taiwanese high scientific competency students and Australian high and low scientific competency students, while debating and planning experiments was a positive determinant for Taiwanese low scientific competency students. High scientific competency students from both Taiwan and Australia demonstrated significantly higher preferences for future STEM careers than low scientific competency students.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-178
Number of pages22
JournalInternational Journal of Science Education
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Enjoyment
  • high- and low-science achieving students
  • inquiry activities
  • PISA 2015
  • STEM career choices

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