Long-term radiographic outcomes and functional evaluation of ulnar shortening osteotomy in patients with ulnar impaction syndrome and reverse oblique sigmoid notch: a retrospective case series study

Hui Kuang Huang, Steve K. Lee, Yi Chao Huang, Cheng Yu Yin, Ming Chau Chang, Jung Pan Wang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Ulnar shortening osteotomy (USO) is an effective treatment for ulnar impaction syndrome. However, there have been reports of osteoarthritis (OA) at the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) when USO was performed on patients with a reverse oblique sigmoid notch. This study aimed to evaluate the radiographic and functional outcomes following USO in patients with a reverse oblique sigmoid notch. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed patients having a reverse oblique sigmoid notch who underwent USO for ulnar impaction syndrome between 2002 and 2013. We evaluated radiographic changes of the DRUJ and functional outcomes of patients. Results: We enrolled 22 patients (22 wrists) with an average age of 49.6 years and a mean follow-up of 93.2 (range, 36–179; standard deviation [SD], 38.2) months. We found that there were changes in the inclination angle of the sigmoid notch, from an average reverse oblique of 14.9o (range, 11o–23o; SD, 3.4o) preoperatively to a more parallel 5.1o (range, 0o–11o; SD, 3.2o) at the final follow-up. The functional results at the final follow-up were good, with a mean visual analogue scale for pain of 0.2 (range, 0–1; SD, 0.4) at rest and 1.3 (range, 0–3; SD, 0.9) during activity, QuickDASH of 15.1 (range, 2.3–34.1; SD, 8.8), and modified Mayo Wrist Score of 91.6 (range, 70–100; SD, 6.4). Seven wrists (31.8%) had changes compatible with OA, but the wrists did not exhibit a significantly worse function when compared to wrists without OA changes, except for supination motion and grip strength. Conclusions: For patients with a reverse oblique sigmoid inclination following USO, we observed that the inclination angle had a tendency to become parallel and some patients developed OA at the DRUJ. However, long-term functional outcomes could still be good. The reverse oblique sigmoid inclination does not seem to be an absolute contraindication for USO.

Original languageEnglish
Article number136
JournalBMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Oblique
  • Reverse
  • Sigmoid notch
  • Ulnar impaction
  • Ulnar shortening

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