Long-Term Mortality Risk in Older Adults with Sarcopenia: An 11-Year Prospective Cohort Study Comparing AWGS 2014 and AWGS 2019 Guidelines for Enhanced Clinical Utility and Accurate Risk Prediction

C. K. Liang, L. N. Peng, M. H. Lin, C. H. Loh, Wei Ju Lee*, F. Y. Hsiao, L. K. Chen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To discern the diagnostic accuracy between the updated diagnostic consensus of the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia (AWGS) in 2019 (AWGS 2019) and the previous AWGS 2014 guidelines. Design: A prospective population-based cohort study. Setting and Participants: The study included 731 older community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 65 years who participated in face-to-face interviews and were followed up for 11-year mortality until 31 Mar 2022. Measurements: We utilized a handgrip strength dynamometer to measure participants’ muscle strength, while their walking speed was determined by a timed 6-meter walk test at their usual pace. Additionally, muscle mass was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning. Sarcopenia was defined as the presence of low muscle mass in combination with weakness and/or slowness both by AWGS 2014 and 2019 criteria. Results: The present study followed 731 participants (mean age 73.4 ± 5.4 years, men predominant 52.8%) over a period of 11 years, yielding 5927 person-years and 159 deaths. Prevalence of sarcopenia defined by AWGS 2019 and 2014 criteria were 8.5% and 6.8%, respectively. Sarcopenia defined by AWGS 2019 (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.04–2.54, p=0.034) but not AWGS 2014 was significantly associated with mortality in community-living older adults after adjusting for potential confounders such as age, sex, education, drinking, disease burden and serum level of testosterone. The study also found that the AWGS 2019 criteria had a better model fitness than AWGS 2014 criteria in predicting mortality. Conclusion: AWGS 2019 criteria outperformed AWGS 2014 in identifying sarcopenia risk and predicting mortality. Screening for sarcopenia in older adults may improve health outcomes by identifying those at increased mortality risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)507-513
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutrition, Health and Aging
Volume27
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2023

Keywords

  • AWGS
  • diagnosis
  • mortality
  • sarcopenia

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