Increased tissue water in patients with severe sepsis affects tissue oxygenation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy: a prospective, observational case-control study

Chin Kuo Lin, Shaw Woei Leu, Ying Huang Tsai, Shao Kui Zhou, Chieh Mo Lin, Shu Yi Huang, Che Chia Chang, Meng Chin Ho, Wei Chun Lee, Min Chi Chen, Ming Szu Hung, Yu Ching Lin, Jhe Ruei Li, Bor Shyh Lin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Tissue oedema affects tissue perfusion and interferes with the monitoring of tissue oxygenation in patients with severe sepsis. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We used a wireless near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) device that transmits tri-wavelength light to quantify tissue haemoglobin (Hb) and water (H2O) content. We estimated tissue H2O in severe sepsis patients and healthy controls, compared their difference, and investigated the correlation of tissue H2O with systemic haemodynamics and its impact on tissue oxygenation. Methods: Seventy-seven adult patients with new-onset severe sepsis admitted to the intensive care unit within 72 h and 30 healthy volunteers (controls) were enrolled. The NIRS device was placed on the participant’s leg to estimate the relative tissue concentrations of oxy-Hb ([HbO2]), deoxy-Hb ([HbR]), total Hb ([HbT]), and H2O ([H2O]) at rest for three consecutive days. Two-sample t-test or Mann-Whitney U test, chi-square test, and generalised estimating equations (GEEs) were used for comparisons. Results: In severe sepsis patients, the [H2O] in the anterior tibia was higher [mean (standard deviation, 95% confidence interval), 10.57 (3.37, 9.81–11.34) vs. 7.40 (1.89, 6.70–8.11)] and the [HbO2], [HbT], and tissue Hb oxygen saturation (StO2) were lower [0.20 (0.01, 0.20–0.20) vs. 0.22 (0.01, 0.22–0.23), 0.42 (0.02, 0.42–0.43) vs. 0.44 (0.02, 0.44–0.45), and 47.25% (1.97%, 46.80–47.70%) vs. 49.88% (1.26%, 49.41–50.35%), respectively] than in healthy controls in first-day measurements. GEE analysis revealed significant differences in [H2O], [HbO2], [HbT], and StO2 between groups over three consecutive days (all P≤0.001). In addition, [HbO2] and StO2 levels gradually decreased over time in the patient group. A negative correlation was observed between [H2O] and [HbO2] and StO2, which became more obvious over time (day 1: r=−0.51 and r=−0.42, respectively; both P<0.01; day 3: r=−0.67 and r=−0.63, respectively, both P<0.01). Systolic arterial pressure was positively related to [H2O] (r=0.51, P<0.05, on day 1) but was not associated with tissue oxygenation parameters. Conclusions: NIRS can be used to quantify tissue H2O. Severe sepsis patients have increased tissue H2O, which responds to changes in arterial blood pressure and affects tissue oxygenation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4953-4967
Number of pages15
JournalQuantitative Imaging in Medicine and Surgery
Volume12
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2022

Keywords

  • Sepsis
  • microcirculation
  • near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)
  • tissue oedema
  • tissue oxygenation

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