Gender differences in coping and anxiety in patients after coronary artery bypass graft surgery in Taiwan

Heng Hsin Tung*, Anita Hunter, Jeng Wei, Chung Yi Chang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Greater use of coping strategies and lower anxiety levels may be related to positive outcomes after coronary artery bypass graft surgery; however, the relationship between them, including by gender, has not been examined in Taiwan. Methods: Cross-sectional survey research design and purposive sampling were used in this study, for which 50 men and 50 women were recruited from a medical center in northern Taiwan. Results: After coronary artery bypass graft surgery, both male and female patients used more problem-focused coping strategies than emotion-focused coping strategies. In comparison with men, women tended to use more blaming of self and had slightly higher scores on both state and trait anxiety. Conclusion: Clinicians need to be aware that the use of appropriate coping strategies can reduce patient anxiety, a finding that needs to be considered when designing effective interventions for these patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)469-479
Number of pages11
JournalHeart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009

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