Effects of exergame-based dual-task training on executive function and dual-task performance in community-dwelling older people: A randomized-controlled trial

Ray Yau Wang*, Yuan Chen Huang, Jun Hong Zhou, Shih Jung Cheng, Yea Ru Yang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Aging is associated with decline in executive function that may lead to reduced dual-task performance. Regular exercise has been recommended for promoting or maintaining mental and physical health in older adults, yet only a fraction of older adults exercise regularly. Exergame training may have the potential to enhance exercise adherence. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of exergame-based dual-task training on executive function and dual-task performance in community-dwelling older adults. Materials and Methods: This was a single-blinded, randomized-controlled trial. Twenty community-dwelling older adults were recruited and randomly assigned to one of two groups. All participants completed 36 trainings, including three 60-minute sessions/week over 12 weeks. Participants in the experimental group received exergame-based dual-task training, while those in the control group received home-based multicomponent exercise training. Measures of executive function, dual-task performance, and community walking ability were assessed before and after the intervention. Results: Significant group · time interactions (P = 0.000–0.027) with large effects were found in all selected outcome measures. Compared with the control group, the experimental group improved significantly in measures of general executive function (P = 0.014), inhibitory control (P = 0.037), cognitive dual-task performance (P < 0.001), and community walking ability (P = 0.002). Enhanced general executive function was highly correlated with either improved motor dual-task performance (r = 0.674) or improved cognitive dual-task performance (r = -0.701). Conclusion: These results suggested that exergame-based dual-task training improved both executive function and dual-task performance in older people. These positive effects could be transferred to enhance community walking ability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)347-354
Number of pages8
JournalGames for health journal
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Cognitive function
  • Community mobility
  • Dual task
  • Exercise intervention
  • Exergame

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