Effects of different dual task training on dual task walking and responding brain activation in older adults with mild cognitive impairment

Hsiang Tsen Kuo, Nai Chen Yeh, Yea Ru Yang, Wen Chi Hsu, Ying Yi Liao, Ray Yau Wang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The concurrent additional tasking impacts the walking performance, and such impact is even greater in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) than in healthy elders. However, effective training program to improve dual task walking ability for the people with MCI is not immediately provided. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of cognitive and motor dual task walking training on dual task walking performance and the responding brain changes in older people with MCI. Thirty older adults with MCI were randomly allocated to receive 24 sessions of 45-min cognitive dual task training (CDTT, n = 9), motor dual task training (MDTT, n = 11), or conventional physical therapy (CPT, n = 10). Gait performance and brain activation during single and dual task walking, and cognitive function assessed by trail-making test (TMT-A, B) and digit span test were measured at pre-, post-test, and 1-month follow-up. Both CDTT and MDTT improved dual task walking with responding activation changes in specific brain areas. The improvements in motor dual task walking performance after both dual task trainings were significantly better than after CPT in the older adults with MCI. Both cognitive and motor dual task training were feasible and beneficial to improve dual task walking ability in older adults with MCI. Trial Registration: The trial was registered to Thai Clinical Trial Registry and the registration number is TCTR20180510002 (first registration date: 10/05/2018).

Original languageEnglish
Article number8490
JournalScientific reports
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

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