Democratising science in deliberative systems: Mobilising lay expertise against industry waste dumping in Taiwan

Mei Fang Fan*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Research on the science–policy interaction that happens in deliberative systems is limited. Drawing on concepts of democratisation of science and deliberation, this study used the case of dumping industrial waste on farmland in Taiwan to explore how local activists and non-governmental organisations contribute to knowledge production, democratising science and the epistemic–ethical–democratic functions for deliberative systems. The research methods used are documentary analysis and in-depth interviews. Local activists problematise official knowledge claims and its validation, deploy situated experiential expertise and engage directly in their own knowledge practices. Local activists and civic organisations play versatile roles in connecting the related networked institutions and intertwined spheres of deliberative systems. Civic activism engages in democratising science and participates in shaping policymaking, leading to the amendment of the Waste Disposal Act.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPublic Understanding of Science
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • deliberative systems
  • democratising science
  • expertise
  • governance
  • waste

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