Decreased regional homogeneity in lingual gyrus, increased regional homogeneity in cuneus and correlations with panic symptom severity of first-episode, medication-naïve and late-onset panic disorder patients

Chien Han Lai*, Yu Te Wu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study was designed to explore regional homogeneity (ReHo), an indicator of the synchronization of brain function, in first-episode, medication-naïve and late-onset patients with panic disorder (PD). Participants comprised 30 patients and 21 healthy controls who underwent with 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning and ReHo functional MRI analysis. All participants were studied with clinical rating scales to assess the severity of PD symptoms. ReHo values were obtained using the REST toolbox (resting-state functional MRI data analysis toolbox). Differences in demographic data and ReHo values between the two groups were evaluated with the independent two-sample t-test function of the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences and REST. There were significant differences in clinical ratings between the two groups. No demographic differences were noted. We found decreased ReHo in the left lingual gyrus and increased ReHo in the right cuneus cortex of patients compared with controls. ReHo values of patients were negatively correlated with PD ratings in the right cuneus. ReHo differences found in the left lingual gyrus and the right cuneus might suggest sensory and inhibitory dysfunction in first-episode, medication-naïve, late-onset patients with PD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-131
Number of pages5
JournalPsychiatry Research - Neuroimaging
Volume211
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 28 Feb 2013

Keywords

  • Cuneus
  • Lingual gyrus
  • Panic disorder
  • Regional homogeneity

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