Credibility of misinformation source moderates the effectiveness of corrective messages on social media

Huai Kuai Zeng, Shih-Yu Lo*, Shu-Chu Sarrina Li

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To examine how different features of corrective messages moderate individuals’ attitudes toward misinformation on social media, a 2 (misinformation source credibility: high vs low) × 2 (corrective message source: algorithmic vs peer correction) × 2 (correction type: factual elaboration vs simple rebuttal) between-subjects experiment was conducted. To reduce perceived credibility and respondents’ attitudes toward the misinformation, peer corrections were more effective than algorithmic corrections for misinformation from a source with lower credibility; for misinformation from a highly credible source, the superiority effect of peer corrections was still significant on perceived credibility but not on respondents’ attitudes toward the misinformation. For the fact-checking tendency, we did not find a robust effect about how different features of corrective messages interacted. Our findings provide important insights into message design in combatting misinformation on social media.
Original languageAmerican English
JournalPublic Understanding of Science
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - 31 Dec 2023

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