Comparison of the surgical outcomes of minimally invasive and open surgery for octogenarian and older compared to younger gastric cancer patients: A retrospective cohort study

Chien An Liu, Kuo Hung Huang, Ming Huang Chen, Su Shun Lo, Anna Fen Yau Li, Chew Wun Wu, Yi Ming Shyr, Wen Liang Fang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: As life expectancy continues to increase around the world, the use of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) could be beneficial for octogenarian and older gastric cancer patients. Methods: A total of 359 gastric cancer patients who underwent curative surgery between March 2011 and March 2015 were enrolled; 80 of these patients (22.2%) were octogenarians and older. Surgical approaches included MIS (50 laparoscopic and 65 robotic) and open surgery (n = 244). Surgical outcomes of MIS and open surgery in octogenarian and older patients were compared with younger patients. Results: Among octogenarian and older patients, relative to open surgery (n = 53), MIS (n = 27) was associated with less operative blood loss, a shorter postoperative hospital stay and similar rates of surgical complications and mortality. For MIS (n = 115), octogenarian and older patients exhibited similar postoperative outcomes to those of younger patients. For open surgery (n = 244), relative to younger patients, octogenarian and older patients experienced longer postoperative hospital stays, a higher rate of wound infection and a higher incidence of pneumonia. Conclusions: MIS for gastric cancer is beneficial and can be performed safely in octogenarian and older patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article number68
JournalBMC Surgery
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 12 Jun 2017

Keywords

  • Gastric cancer
  • Minimally invasive surgery
  • Octogenarian and older
  • Open surgery

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