Carboxyl terminus of HSP70-interacting protein attenuates advanced glycation end products-induced cardiac injuries by promoting NFκB proteasomal degradation

Kuan Ho Lin, Ayaz Ali, Chia Hua Kuo, Pei Chen Yang, Velmurugan B. Kumar, Viswanadha V. Padma, Jeng Fan Lo, Chih Yang Huang, Wei Wen Kuo*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are highly reactive molecules resulting from persistent high-glucose levels, can lead to the generation of oxidative stress and cardiac complications. The carboxyl terminus of HSP70 interacting protein (CHIP) has been demonstrated to have a protective role in several diseases, including cardiac complications; however, the role in preventing AGE-induced cardiac damages remains poorly understood. Here, we found that elevated AGE levels impaired cardiac CHIP expression in streptozotocin-induced diabetes and high-fat diet-administered animals, representing AGE exposure models. We used the TUNEL assay, hematoxylin and eosin, Masson′s trichrome staining, and western blotting to prove that cardiac injuries were induced in diabetic animals and AGE-treated cardiac cells. Interestingly, our results collectively indicated that CHIP overexpression significantly rescued the AGE-induced cardiac injuries and promoted cell survival. Moreover, CHIP knockdown-mediated stabilization of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) was attenuated by overexpressing CHIP in the cells. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation and immunoblot assay revealed that CHIP promotes the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of AGE-induced NFκB. Importantly, fluorescence microscopy, a luciferase reporter assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and subcellular fractionation further demonstrated that CHIP overexpression inhibits AGE-induced NFκB nuclear translocation, reduced its binding ability with the promoter sequences of the receptor of AGE, consequently inhibiting the translocation of the receptor AGE to the cell membrane for its proper function. Overall, our current study findings suggest that CHIP can target NFκB for ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation, and thereby potentially rescue AGE-induced cardiac damages.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Cellular Physiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

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