Associations Between Chewing and Swallowing Problems and Physical and Psychosocial Health Status of Long-Term Care Residents in Taiwan: A Pilot Study

Tze Fang Wang*, I. Ju Chen, I. Chuan Li

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Oral health is often overlooked in institutional elder care but may have an impact on general health and ability to communicate. We aimed to determine the factor associated with chewing and swallowing problems among long-term care residents in Taiwan. Staff nurses trained to evaluate oral health assessed 781 residents using relevant sections of the Minimum Data Set 2.1 for nursing homes (Chinese version), including the Cognitive Performance Scale, Index of Social Engagement, and Activities of Daily Living Scale. Individuals with chewing and swallowing problems (n = 345) tended to be women (odds ratio [OR] = 1.51, P = .019) in smaller facilities (OR = 4.18, P < .001) with fewer natural teeth (OR = 0.54, P = .011); more broken, loose, or carious teeth (OR = 1.74, P = .042); and with more frequently inflamed gums (OR = 2.72, P = .025) than residents without chewing and swallowing problems (n = 436). Residents' chewing and swallowing problems were significantly associated with parenteral/enteral intake, oral health status, nutritional status, concomitant disease and infection, cognitive function, and social engagement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)184-193
Number of pages10
JournalGeriatric Nursing
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012

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