Association of cognitive impairment and reduced cortical thickness in prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex with treatment-resistant depression

Mu Hong Chen, Wan Chen Chang, Pei Chi Tu*, Wei Chen Lin, Cheng Ta Li, Wen Sheng Huang, Ya Mei Bai, Shih Jen Tsai, Tung Ping Su

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Accumulating evidence suggests the critical role of cortical thinning in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. However, the association of cortical thickness and cognitive impairment with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) has rarely been investigated. In total, 48 adult patients with TRD and 48 healthy controls were recruited and administered a series of neurocognitive and neuroimaging examinations, including 1-back and 2-back working memory tasks and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Whole-brain cortical thickness analysis was performed to investigate the differences in the cortical thickness between patients with TRD and controls. The patients had reduced cortical thickness in the frontal cortex, particularly at the left frontal pole, left inferior frontal cortex, and left anterior cingulate cortex, and left middle temporal cortex compared with the healthy controls. Moreover, in the 2-back working memory task, the cortical thickness in the left frontal pole and left anterior cingulate cortex was positively associated with mean error in the patients, but not in the controls. Reduced cortical thickness in the frontal pole and anterior cingulate cortex is associated with TRD and related cognitive impairment. Our study indicated the crucial effects of the frontal and temporal cortical thickness on the pathophysiology of TRD and cognitive impairment in patients with TRD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1854-1862
Number of pages9
JournalBrain Imaging and Behavior
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022

Keywords

  • Cortical thickness
  • Treatment-resistant depression
  • Working memory

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