Association between sleep patterns and diurnal blood pressure variation and its predictors in women with systemic lupus erythematosus

Yin Chi Cheng, Chin Chou Huang, Wei Sheng Chen, De Feng Huang, Shiow Ching Shun, Shao Yu Tsai*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Sleep disturbances and hypertension are common health issues in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Limited information is available regarding the objective sleep quality and the variation of diurnal blood pressure (BP) in patients with SLE. Moreover, the relationship between sleep patterns and diurnal BP variation in SLE patients is not clear. Purpose: To explore the subjective/objective sleep patterns and the diurnal BP variation in women with SLE, to identify the factors associated with diurnal BP variation, and to identify the predictors of this variation. Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational study was conducted and 42 women with SLE were recruited. Participants completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Brief Pain Inventory. Rheumatologists rated current lupus disease activity. Additionally, the participants wore a wrist actigraph for 7 consecutive days and underwent 24h ambulatory BP monitoring for one day. Results: The mean Global PSQI score was 7.74 ± 3.21; 69% of the participants reported poor subjective sleep quality; the actigraphy-measured sleep efficiency was 85.29 ± 5.95%; and 42.9% had poor objective sleep quality. Total sleep time at night was positively associated with diurnal change in diastolic BP (r = .315. p < .05) and pain severity was negatively associated with diurnal change in systolic BP (r = -.430, p < .01) and diastolic BP (r = -.371, p < .05). Multiple linear regression analysis was used to predict diurnal BP variation. Moreover, pain was a significant predictor of diurnal change in systolic BP (β = -0.397, p < .01) and diurnal change in diastolic BP (β = -0.325, p < .05). Conclusions/Implications for Practice: The findings of the present study suggest that healthcare professionals should routinely evaluate sleep quality and pain in SLE patients. Improving both the poor sleep and pain management of these patients is clinically important. Further studies of the association between pain management and diurnal BP variation are needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-53
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Nursing
Volume65
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2018

Keywords

  • Actigraphy
  • Diurnal blood pressure
  • Pain
  • Sleep
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus

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