Association between satellite-based estimates of long-term PM2.5 exposure and cardiovascular disease: evidence from the Indonesian Family Life Survey

Sepridawati Siregar, Nora Idiawati, Wen Chi Pan, Kuo Pin Yu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Exposure to particulate matter with a diameter < 2.5 µm (PM2.5) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the leading cause of both morbidity and mortality in Indonesia, accounting for one-third of all deaths. Indonesian authorities started to monitor PM2.5 levels in urban areas in 2015. However, there is still no study examining the association between long-term PM2.5 exposure and CVD in Indonesia. In this study, we combined PM2.5 data and health survey data. Long-term (2000–2007) exposure to PM2.5 was measured based on satellite-derived aerosol optical depth measurements (1 × 1 km2) that could be used to predict ground-level PM2.5 concentrations. Population data on residents of Sumatra Island were obtained from the fourth wave of the Indonesian Family Life Survey (IFLS). A cross-sectional study was performed with 2324 participants who were aged ≥ 40 years old, and a report of doctor-diagnosed CVD determined CVD status. We used logistic regression to analyze the association between PM2.5 and CVD prevalence, adjusting for multiple covariates. Of the sample, 52.1% were women, and 47.9% were men. The sample was divided into those aged 40–59 (adults) and those ≥ 60 (older adults). The CVD prevalence was 4.05% (n = 94), with a mean (standard deviation) PM2.5 concentration of 14.4 (6.4) µg/m3. In adjusted models, a 10-µg/m3 increase in annual average PM2.5 levels was associated with 29% higher odds of having CVD (odds ratio = 1.29; 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 1.47). In this population-based IFLS data, long-term exposure to PM2.5 is associated with a higher prevalence of CVD in Sumatera, Indonesia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21156-21165
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironmental Science and Pollution Research
Volume29
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2022

Keywords

  • Aerosol optical depth
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Cross-sectional study
  • Particulate matter

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