Age-related changes in the association of resting-state fMRI signal variability and global functional connectivity in non-demented healthy people

Wanqing Xie, Chung Kang Peng, Jihong Shen, Ching Po Lin, Shih Jen Tsai, Shujuan Wang, Qianqian Chu, Albert C. Yang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research suggests that the aging relates to variability of resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) signal and the functional connectivity. However, the association between the spatial and temporal activity of resting-state fMRI signal was less documented. We recruited 477 healthy Han Chinese participants, who were separated into young, middle and old groups to investigate the relationship between the variability and global functional connectivity (gFC) in different age ranges using standard deviation (SD) of time series and gFC, respectively. Our analysis revealed the changing patterns during healthy aging: 1) 17 brain regions(Olfactory_L, Orbital_L etc.) were identified to have significant association of age with both SD and gFC respectively by linear regression analysis; 2) Two typical associations could be observed between SD and gFC: positive and negative correlations; 3) The variation ratio of SD to gFC was changing with age at the voxel level by using unsupervised clustering method. It is the first time to combine voxel-wise variability and gFC together for the study of age-related changes with rs-fMRI signal. This study may provide a new clue for understanding the synchronization of human brain based on SD and gFC due to the effect of aging.

Original languageEnglish
Article number113257
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume291
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Age-related brain activity change
  • Brain signal variability
  • Resting-state fmri signal
  • Voxel-wise functional connectivity

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