A Preliminary Study on Self-Healing and Self-Health Management in Older Adults: Perspectives From Healthcare Professionals and Older Adults in Taiwan

Kuei Hui Chu, Heng Hsin Tung, Daniel L. Clinciu, Hua I. Hsu, Yi Chen Wu, Ching I. Hsu, Shu Wei Lin, Shi Jun Pan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The human body has tremendous self-healing capacity and regeneration after injuries and pathogen invasions. These factors are particularly important in older adults which take longer to heal and recover physically. In addition to clinical investigations, perspectives from both experts in the field and the living experiences of the general public could play significant roles to enhance the body’s healing mechanisms in older adults. A semi-structured interview was conducted which included 15 participants (9 experts and 6 older adults aged 65 years and older). Content analysis with an inductive approach was employed about participants’ experiences and perspectives. All participants in this study revealed that self-healing mechanisms can be enhanced through physiological, psychological, and socio-environmental factors. When more of these factors can be integrated into a recovery management plan, it can hasten self-healing in older adults. Social capability has a profound impact on an individual’s mental health while oral health and hygiene significantly affect the nutritional intake status. In regards to physical aspects, regular daily activity patterns, nutritious eating, moderate exercise, and sleep quality are significant, while psychological aspects such as cheerfulness, positive attitudes, and good interpersonal relationships can help control chronic diseases.

Original languageEnglish
JournalGerontology and Geriatric Medicine
Volume8
DOIs
StatePublished - 10 Feb 2022

Keywords

  • healthy aging
  • older adults
  • recovery management
  • self-healing

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